Join Us Tomorrow, Friday, July 31, 2015

July 31 flyer

Click here for the flyer for this event, for your sharing and posting. The event is open to all with no admission charge.

Thank you, Ford Food and Drink, for hosting this event.

Learn more about our readers here.

About Our Readers: July 31, 2015 VoiceCatcher Event

Hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions, Friday, July 31, 2015, Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97202, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Meet and mingle with others in the VoiceCatcher community. The reading is open to all.

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich is a poet and project manager who enjoys living, working and writing in Portland, Oregon.

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas is a writer, editor and spoken word artist. Her fiction, nonfiction and poetry have appeared in The Utne Reader, The Nervous Breakdown, Southwestern American Literature, Fourth River, Weber – The Contemporary West, and Bayou Magazine, among other publications. In 2014 her work was a finalist for the Best of the Net award. She is the author of the fiction chapbook Pyrophitic (ELJ Publications, 2014) and holds an MFA from Pacific University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she serves as a collaborative editor with Indigo Editing & Publications and a reader for Tin House Magazine.

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory lives in Washougal, Washington. Her poetry has appeared in Bamboo Ridge: The Hawaii Writers’ Quarterly; La’ila’I; Sister Stew: Fiction and Poetry by Women; VoiceCatcher, the Winter Issue, 2013; Just Now, 20 New Portland Poets; and America the National Catholic Weekly, Dec 2. 2013 and March 2, 2015.

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston is an Oregon writer and filmmaker. Her poems have appeared in such journals as Calyx, Gold Man Review, Natural Bridge, and War, Literature and the Arts. She is a recipient of a fellowship from Oregon Literary Arts and was selected as a Fishtrap Fellow. Her collection of poems about a family’s healing from war, Red Dust Rising, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger is a junior at the Oregon Episcopal School in Portland. She loves travel, soccer, photography and science. She tends to write in short bursts which make no sense but are strangely effective.

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose has published stories, essays, poems, reviews and a novel called Little Miss Strange (Algonquin), as well as other pieces that do not fall into any of those categories. Her work appeared most recently in Cream City Review, CloudBank and Oregon Humanities, and in the anthology The Night, and the Rain, and the River (Forest Avenue Press). With her teaching partner Stevan Allred, she is co-host of the Pinewood Table critique group. She has dogs, and would usually rather be at the beach. She sometimes hangs out at www.joannarose.xyz.

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge’s poems have appeared in Gravel, Apeiron Review, Right Hand Pointing, Cryopoetry, and other print and online journals. Her poems have been shortlisted for numerous awards, and nominated for inclusion in both the Pushcart and Best of the Net anthologies. Her fifth and sixth chapbooks, Move Your Lips When You Read and Road to Damascus were released by Grizelda Press, December 2014.

 

July 31 flyerClick here for the flyer for this event, for your own sharing and posting.

VoiceCatcher thanks Ford Food and Drink for hosting this event.

An Embarrassment of Riches: Inspiration from Folk Tales, Mythology and Dreams

Writing Your Own Folk Tale
by Jennifer Kemnitz

I don’t know about you, but I feel like I could write half a dozen tales just spinning off the chicken hut passage in last month’s article. First, though, let’s look at general motifs to understand the structure of these tales and how they tick. Padraic Colum, a 20th-century Irish folklorist, says in his introduction to The Complete Grimm’s Fairy Tales, pp. ix-x, that special patterning in folk and fairy tales makes them recognizable.

One patterning feature is the use of chiming words to highlight passages. This might be actual rhyme, such as in “If you ride straight ahead, it is into the marriage bed.” Or, the rhyme pattern might be looser, such as vowel or consonant rhyme (termed assonance and consonance in poetry). Repetition may also appear, such as the hero’s incantation beginning, “Little hut, little hut.” This device increases suspense, as in “Little Red-Cap” on p.142 of Grimm’s. The heroine remarks to the wolf in disguise, “Oh! Grandmother … what big ears you have!” Then the phrase is repeated with the body part changed, focusing on eyes, hands, and finally the mouth, when he eats her.

A second feature is the tangible thing at the center of the story. These tales usually give special importance to a useful, familiar article, such as a hairbrush or a mirror. This grounds the story in reality and pulls in its listeners and readers; it also enchants the everyday world after the story. Will using a mirror ever feel quite the same after “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves”?

The third feature is a combination of the first two: items that correspond with each other, perhaps through echo or chime. Examples of correspondences are the mirror and glass coffin in “Snow White,” the spindle and thorns in “Sleeping Beauty/Briar Rose,” and the tall tower and long hair in “Rapunzel.” Having these elements mirror and talk to each other gives an internal coherence to the world of the tale, no matter how different it may feel from our everyday reality. Using items of symbolic value to the tale is also key.

Writing a folk tale puts you in a special frame of mind; you are approximating dream space or mythological time-space. Focus on the meaning behind the action rather than on how things actually happen in our world. Think of how your dreams work, how abrupt and illogical the scene changes can seem, how the dream story feels to you, the effects in the psyche.

The folk style can give rise to interesting authorial voices, voices full of crackle and charm. This vitality can arrest the readers and catch them up in the narrative. I have felt freed by experimenting with these voices, myself. Simply donning a magisterial, omniscient voice or a winking, comical one leads to interesting outcomes in narrative.

I have written a few fairy or folk tales, and an even greater number of hybrid tales edging into surreal or uncanny territory. A larger dose of realism mixed in with folky elements might yield magical realism and other possibilities. Some of my poetry also carries these elements and influences. A poem might start with a kernel from a dream and then become more realistic. Or, it might begin as realistically descriptive, then flip over suddenly into another dimension. You can achieve various effects this way.

Here are starting points and exercises to integrate fairy tale motifs into your own work:

  • Find an incident or experience in your or someone else’s life and start spinning a folk story around it. Just start playing and see what happens.
  • Pick a plant, an animal, and a human with passions and a problem. You probably have the beginning of a tale right there if you inject some dream logic in the telling.
  • With a particular person or character in mind, what kind of magical tale might that person find him or herself in? For instance, I am writing a fairy tale starring my grandmother as a child. She was unknown to me in many ways; she was not forthcoming about herself and her feelings, much less her dreams. I want to know more, but she has passed on. Now I am writing her into an interesting imaginal space of my own, based on her time period and place of origin. While the character will probably end up with few similarities with my actual grandmother, she is a starting point and an impetus to write.
  • Another jumping-off point might be a public figure you are fascinated with or even tired of hearing about in the media. Mine the National Enquirer for ideas. Names can always be changed once the tale is spun!
  • Or, pick a familiar, practical object you would like to explore by infusing it with fairy tale associations. Make the story hinge on this object, maybe making it useful to one of the characters at a crucial point. I once read a funny Lithuanian folk tale about a bread roll and its adventures in the world. Really! So it could be anything. Wouldn’t it be exciting to read a modern folk tale that incorporated a smart phone? Or a lawnmower?  How about a can opener? And how fascinating to imagine what these objects might symbolize.

Finally, what are your favorite stories – written, oral, or from television and cinema? Write down the bones, figure out why they work, and transform them with the symbolism of dream. After all, many fairy and folk tales in the Western canon originated in India. As they spread out, over centuries, they changed according to people’s local tastes and the times. Let’s keep that ball rolling!

 

Jennifer KemnitzJennifer Kemnitz is an herbalist-poet who lives and writes in Portland. She is a great defender of plant life, and can be roused at any moment to an impassioned discussion of its innate intelligence. Jennifer has been published previously in VoiceCatcher and anthologized by Poetry on the Lake and The Poetry Box. Her work is forthcoming from We’Moon and the Kerf.  This article is the third and final in her enchanting series, “An Embarrassment of Riches,” special to VoiceCatcher.

Reading Out Loud

by Jackie Shannon-Hollis

Mom used to recite poems to us kids. She recited them beautifully, with upbeats and downbeats, pauses and accents. “The Raven,” “The Highwayman,” “Little Boy Blue,” “The Spider and the Fly.” I got lost in the stories of those poems. When I grew older and had to recite poems for school, Mom coached me on how to have just the right inflection here, to raise your arm there. I wanted to do it as perfectly as she did. I wanted others to feel as I did when she spoke those poems to us. With her encouragement and with practice, I came to love reading out loud as much as Mom did.

Years later, when I was invited to read one of my stories at a public event, it was time to refresh my skills. I was nervous. I was excited. I would be reading my own work, and not just to a bunch of kids who had to sit and listen. This audience would be there by choice, and with different expectations. I asked a friend – a stage actor – to coach me. Her tips and Mom’s early guidance have been with me as I have prepared for every reading since.

Here is what I have learned.

I get nervous right before a reading. This can be helpful in creating a good kind of energy. But if it overwhelms us, we do not do such a good job. Usually we get nervous when we think the focus is all on us. The best remedy for this is to direct your focus outward, to your audience members. They want you to do well and you are there to give them an experience, to be moved, to be touched in some way, to laugh, to recognize themselves.

Your job is to provide them the experience of your story. Consider the tone of your story. What is the feeling or emotion you want to convey? Your pacing, your tone of voice, your beats and pauses should reflect the emotional tone of your story. Where do you speed up, where do you slow down? Where do you pause? Where do you gesture, or do you? Mark your pages, to remind yourself as you are reading: pause here, slow down, staccato. Breathe.

Ask a friend to coach you. Or, better yet, find a coach. Jane Geesman is a friend of mine and an actor. She coaches other actors, writers and others who speak in public. She and her business partner, Sarah Lucht, also offer classes applying acting techniques to other areas of life. You can find them at Act Natural. The classes, or individual coaching sessions, can help improve your diction, reduce nerves, and improve your sense of presence and intention.

Practice. Yes, you are a writer not an actor; no need to have your lines memorized. And you need not over-dramatize your reading. In fact this can be a turn off unless you do it really well. But it is important to commit to the story. Do not over do, but do not under do. And watch out for taking on a “This American Life” voice. Use YOUR own voice.

Practice some more. You are telling your story. The more you prepare, the more comfortable you will be. This is the place where the emotional tone of the story walks in. Practice in front of a mirror. Look up and see yourself, so that when you are in front of the audience you will feel comfortable looking up and away from your pages. Maybe even make eye contact. It is far better for the audience to see your face than the crown of your head.

All this practice will improve your writing. It will force you to examine every line, pause and word. You will find flaws in logic, language or pacing and clean them up. That is good news for your work. I have had several stories accepted for publication after I read them in public.

Think about what you will wear. What is the venue? I seem to get colder when I read, but then there is a sudden burst of warm. Wear layers for varying temperatures. Avoid noisy jewelry or items that might distract the audience. If you have long hair, wear it so we can see your face. Dress comfortably but keep in mind that you are there for the audience. Prepare for them.

Prepare your pages so they are easy to read in any kind of light. I use a big font so I can avoid wearing reading glasses. Make sure your pages are in order. At my reading for VoiceCatcher my pages were not in order. A silly mistake, but a good reminder to check and check again.

Arrive early. Speak with the event host. Go stand at the lectern or on the stage, and see what the light is like and where it is comfortable for you to stand. If you are part of a line up of readers find out where you are in the order so you can pace your energy accordingly. Be present and supportive of any readers before you. Be a part of the audience, be entertained, maybe even learn a few tips for your own reading.

When it is your turn, take a moment to take in the moment. Say something to ground yourself and connect with the audience. An acknowledgement of the occasion. An appreciation of their attendance. What the reading means to you. Then begin reading. Commit fully, with intention, to the beauty of your work.

Say “yes” to whatever presents itself in the course of your reading: people entering or leaving, a loud noise, messed up pages. Go with it. Keep reading if you can.  Acknowledge the distraction if needed. If the noise is too loud for the audience to hear you, stop and wait until the quiet comes again. If you lose your place, pause and find it again.

This is a wonderful opportunity to share your work. Have fun!

 

Jackie Shannon-HollisJackie Shannon-Hollis’ work has appeared in journals including The Sun, High Desert Journal, Inkwell and Slice Magazine. She is a native Oregonian, born and raised surrounded by wheat on the dry, east side of the state – now thriving in the cedars and wet on the west side. Her essay in the VoiceCatcher Winter 2015 issue is part of a memoir in progress.

 

 

Catch These Voices and Visions

Carolyn Martin

Carolyn Martin

In Another Voice: An interactive reading featuring VoiceCatcher persona poet Carolyn Martin, along with poet Kate Kingston and artist Lawrence Wheeler. Includes discussion into the topic of the persona poem, addressing craft, inspiration and research. Audience participation encouraged. Free admission, open to the public, all ages. Come early for Glyph’s eclectic menu. The kitchen closes promptly at 5:00 p.m. but beer, wine, cold drinks and pastries will be available throughout the event.

Glyph Café & Arts Space Thursday, July 30, 2015 5:00–7:00 p.m. Portland, OR 97209

Claudia F. SavageVoiceCatcher Claudia F. Savage presents several poetry workshops through The Attic Institute in SE Portland this July, August, and September-October. One-day workshops and ongoing weekly ones.

 * * *

July 31 flyerVoiceCatcher Reading: Contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions present their original work. Friday, July 31, 2015, 7:00–9:00 p.m. at Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97202. Meet and mingle with others in the VoiceCatcher community. The reading is open to all; no admission charge. More info here.

Polish your skills as a presenter and public reader through the Toastmasters program. Unique among Toastmasters clubs, the local Thrill of the Quill club caters to writers. This club meets the first Saturday of each month (check their website calendar for exceptions). All are welcome to attend; no admission charge.

Thrill of the Quill Toastmasters Club Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015 9:30–11:00 a.m. Courtyard Village 4555 NE 66th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98661 360-606-9306

Pearl WaldorfThrough Portland Women Writers, VoiceCatcher Pearl Waldorf offers a one-day writing and creativity workshop this August. (Please note date change to Aug. 22) Participants will immerse in the powerful model inspired by The Hakomi Method, a body-centered form of psychotherapy. Pearl says, “We’ll spend a day together luxuriating in the gift of our own undivided attention, a transformative practice in itself. With compassionate guidance, we’ll dip into embodied experiences of the four stages of creative flow.”

Writing Through the Four Stages of Creative Flow Saturday, August 22, 2015, 9:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m. The Studio at Box Lift Lofts 333 NE Hancock, Studio 16, Portland, OR 97212 Cost: $100

Pearl’s story sharing evenings, exploring our complex interpersonal relationships at work through the lens of attachment theory, continue at no charge through 2015.

* * *

Save the Date! The Oregon Writers’ Colony will present its second annual Stumptown conference, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2015. It will be at the Crown Plaza Hotel in NE Portland, OR.

* * *

Click here for the updated calendar of readings from VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions.

Click here for the contact form to let us know of other offerings you or other VoiceCatcher members are making in the community!

Healthy Mind, Healthy Spirit – Limitless Possibilities

Name that Fear and Claim It
by Kari Pederson

I loved watching the game show “Name That Tune.” For those of you unfamiliar with this television gem, contestants were forced to guess how many notes they needed to correctly identify a song. Some participants knew a tune after one or two notes, but I never did this very well.

However, I instantly recognize one particular song that quickly: the theme song from the movie Jaws. Sharks have terrified me since I was a little girl.

No big deal, right? Just stay away from bodies of water and everything will be fine. Except for the irony that I LOVE water as much I hate sharks. This paradox constantly pushes me to confront my fear in order to do something I really enjoy.

Before I could deal with my fear, however, I had to change the way I thought about fear. Handling fear effectively is really two topics: understanding your fear and finding the best tools for dealing with it. This month’s column is an invitation to claim your own fears and make peace with having them.

1. Ready, Set, Go? 

Step one on the path to understanding your fears is to decide if you feel ready to examine them. If you are dealing with a tough issue or important deadline, or are feeling vulnerable or exhausted, it might not be the right time to open this Pandora’s box. Waiting until you feel ready to look at your fears is not only a smart choice but an honorable one.

2. Fears can protect and guide us

Fears are natural, healthy and hardwired through evolution into our DNA. Fear kept us on the lookout for prehistoric beasts, hidden dangers and helped the human species ultimately to thrive.

Fear also protects us from modern day attackers. Many assault victims describe a moment before the attack where their brain warned them, “All is not ok! Get away!”

Sometimes fear guides us by not letting us be complacent about important issues. Those butterflies in the pit of your stomach are a signal that something important needs your attention.

3. Embrace Your Fears and Claim Them

For a long time, I kept my fear of sharks hidden. I felt ridiculous having this phobia when I lived in a landlocked state known for its abundance of fresh water. I knew sharks could not survive in a lake or pool, yet I still panicked whenever I thought about what might be lurking underneath the ripples. I was ashamed of my fear, but this extra guilt only kept me from taking positive action. Cut yourself some slack and give yourself permission to own your fears without extra baggage.

4. Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable

While researching fear and courage, I discovered many descriptions of people taking amazing actions while they felt fear. Courage is not the absence of fear but taking action in spite of it. Soldiers, policemen, fire fighters, bystanders and parents routinely put themselves in harm’s way even though they were afraid.

The good news is that most present-day fears are imagined or artificial. We might feel like our giving a presentation is life threatening, but we are not likely to be in actual danger. Fear can make our hearts race, palms sweat, and otherwise feel terrible, but most fearful situations are actually benign.

I find it helpful to remember that these feelings of discomfort are just part of the process of exercising my courage muscles – much like I might expect to have sore muscles after a new physical workout.

5. Allow Yourself the Journey of Self-Discovery

If you are unsure what gets the attention of your inner “fraidycat,” take some time to notice the situations where you feel fear. This self-awareness allows you more control about when you want to face your fear. If you know cocktail parties are a fear trigger, you can skip gatherings not worth the extra effort.

Social psychology research suggests that fears of public speaking, rejection or judgment affect all of us at some point or another. If you share your work as a visual artist or writer, then chances are you will have opportunities to face fear. A little preparation can go a long way in helping you be ready to flex your courage muscles. In next month’s column, we will focus on specific tools you can use to face your fears head on. “Watch out Jaws, I’m coming for you!”

 

Kari Pederson Age 6

Kari Pederson
Age 6

Kari Pederson, MSW, LCSW, is a writer, clinical social worker and wellness coach who has worked with children and adults for over 25 years. An avid student of positive psychology, she loves helping people live their best lives. Kari is a new writer to VoiceCatcher’s community website and thrilled to be part of its mission. This is the fifth installment in her series, Healthy Spirit – Limitless Possibilities.

 

Hot Off the Press: The Summer 2015 Issue of VoiceCatcher’s Journal

by Tiah Lindner Raphael, Managing Editor

I am pleased to announce the release of the Summer 2015 issue of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. This is the seventh issue of our online journal.

Many thanks to our hard-working editorial team: Young Voices editor Kris Demien; art editor Sarah Fagan; prose editors Helen Sinoradzki and Christi R. Suzanne; and poetry editors Jennifer Dorner, Pattie Palmer-Baker, Claudia F. Savage and Cindy Stewart-Rinier. Big thanks are especially due to journal designer Shawn Aveningo – for her thoughtful reinvigoration of our online format to better showcase the work of our featured artists.

We are excited about the authors and artists represented in these pages and hope you will come out to meet them in person by attending a VoiceCatcher event. Happy summer reading!

 

Tiah Linder RaphaelTiah Lindner Raphael is the president for VoiceCatcher as well as managing editor for VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. Tiah has spent over nine years in communications positions for public-service organizations. Her poetry appeared in the Winter 2014 issue of VoiceCatcher and she has served as both a prose and a poetry editor for our publications. Her work has appeared in journals such as CutBank Literary Magazine and Paper Nautilus. When she is not playing with words, Tiah can be found indulging in her other creative obsessions including photography and urban gardening, or fighting an often losing battle with the travel bug.

 

 

Catch These Voices and Visions

Tricia KnollVoiceCatchers Claudia F. Savage and Tricia Knoll will be among the poets reading at the release of Jacqueline Freeman’s book, The Song of Increase: Returning to Our Sacred Relationship with Honeybees. Join them for bees, vegetables and other summer mayhem.

Monday, July 13, 2015
7:00–9:00 p.m.
Sound Grounds
3701 SE Belmont, Portland, OR 97214

Claudia F. SavageClaudia F. Savage continues her weekly workshop, A Poet’s Rhythm. The next series begins Sunday, July 19, 2015, 10:00–noon, and meets for seven weeks. She also presents several poetry workshops at The Attic Institute in SE Portland this summer.

Kristin Roedell

Kristin Roedell

Kristin Roedell’s new book of poetry, Downriver, was a finalist for the Quercus Review Press poetry prize. Now it has been published by Kelsay Books via Aldrich Press. Downriver is available on Amazon. Kristin is a long-time contributor and volunteer for VoiceCatcher, and offers poetry mentoring on its behalf.

*  *  *

Polish your skills as a presenter and public reader through the Toastmasters program. Unique among Toastmasters clubs, the local Thrill of the Quill club caters to writers. This club meets the first Saturday of each month (check their website calendar for exceptions). All are welcome to attend; no admission charge.

Thrill of the Quill Toastmasters Club
Saturday, July 11, 2015
Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015
9:30–11:00 a.m.
Courtyard Village 4555 NE 66th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98661
360-606-9306

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Margie Lee

Margie Lee

See VoiceCatcher Margie Lee’s art on display at Mel’s Frame Shop, 1007 SW Morrison, Portland, OR 97205. Her show “Figuration” is on display May 19–July 18, 2015.

Liz Prato

Liz Prato

VoiceCatcher prose editor Liz Prato presents her debut story collection, Baby’s on Fire, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 7:00 p.m. at Annie Bloom’s Books. 7834 SW Capitol Hwy., Portland, OR 97219.  503-246-0053.


July 31 flyerVoiceCatcher Reading.
Contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions present their original work. Friday, July 31, 2015, 7:00–9:00 p.m. at Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97202. Meet and mingle with others in the VoiceCatcher community. The reading is open to all; no admission charge. More info here.

Pearl WaldorfThrough Portland Women Writers, VoiceCatcher Pearl Waldorf offers a one-day writing and creativity workshop this August. (Please note date change to Aug. 22)

Participants will immerse in the powerful model inspired by The Hakomi Method, a body-centered form of psychotherapy. Pearl says, “We’ll spend a day together luxuriating in the gift of our own undivided attention, a transformative practice in itself. With compassionate guidance, we’ll dip into embodied experiences of the four stages of creative flow.”

Writing Through the Four Stages of Creative Flow
Saturday, August 22, 2015, 9:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
The Studio at Box Lift Lofts
333 NE Hancock, Studio 16, Portland, OR 97212
Cost: $100

Pearl’s story sharing evenings, exploring our complex interpersonal relationships at work through the lens of attachment theory, continue at no charge through 2015.

* * *

Save the Date! The Oregon Writers’ Colony will present its second annual Stumptown conference, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2015. It will be at the Crown Plaza Hotel in NE Portland, OR.

* * *

Click here for the updated calendar of readings from VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions.

Click here for the contact form to let us know of other offerings you or other VoiceCatcher members are making in the community!

Join Us Friday, July 31, 2015

July 31 flyer

Click here for the flyer for this event, for your sharing and posting. The event is open to all with no admission charge.

Thank you, Ford Food and Drink, for hosting this event.

Learn more about our readers here.

About Our Readers: July 31, 2015 VoiceCatcher Event

Hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions, Friday, July 31, 2015, Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97202, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Meet and mingle with others in the VoiceCatcher community. The reading is open to all.

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich is a poet and project manager who enjoys living, working and writing in Portland, Oregon.

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas is a writer, editor and spoken word artist. Her fiction, nonfiction and poetry have appeared in The Utne Reader, The Nervous Breakdown, Southwestern American Literature, Fourth River, Weber – The Contemporary West, and Bayou Magazine, among other publications. In 2014 her work was a finalist for the Best of the Net award. She is the author of the fiction chapbook Pyrophitic (ELJ Publications, 2014) and holds an MFA from Pacific University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she serves as a collaborative editor with Indigo Editing & Publications and a reader for Tin House Magazine.

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory lives in Washougal, Washington. Her poetry has appeared in Bamboo Ridge: The Hawaii Writers’ Quarterly; La’ila’I; Sister Stew: Fiction and Poetry by Women; VoiceCatcher, the Winter Issue, 2013; Just Now, 20 New Portland Poets; and America the National Catholic Weekly, Dec 2. 2013 and March 2, 2015.

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston is an Oregon writer and filmmaker. Her poems have appeared in such journals as Calyx, Gold Man Review, Natural Bridge, and War, Literature and the Arts. She is a recipient of a fellowship from Oregon Literary Arts and was selected as a Fishtrap Fellow. Her collection of poems about a family’s healing from war, Red Dust Rising, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger is a junior at the Oregon Episcopal School in Portland. She loves travel, soccer, photography and science. She tends to write in short bursts which make no sense but are strangely effective.

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose has published stories, essays, poems, reviews and a novel called Little Miss Strange (Algonquin), as well as other pieces that do not fall into any of those categories. Her work appeared most recently in Cream City Review, CloudBank and Oregon Humanities, and in the anthology The Night, and the Rain, and the River (Forest Avenue Press). With her teaching partner Stevan Allred, she is co-host of the Pinewood Table critique group. She has dogs, and would usually rather be at the beach. She sometimes hangs out at www.joannarose.xyz.

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge’s poems have appeared in Gravel, Apeiron Review, Right Hand Pointing, Cryopoetry, and other print and online journals. Her poems have been shortlisted for numerous awards, and nominated for inclusion in both the Pushcart and Best of the Net anthologies. Her fifth and sixth chapbooks, Move Your Lips When You Read and Road to Damascus were released by Grizelda Press, December 2014.

 

July 31 flyerClick here for the flyer for this event, for your own sharing and posting.

VoiceCatcher thanks Ford Food and Drink for hosting this event.