PLONK Reading Series f. VoiceCatcher, Wednesday October 5

All are invited to hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. 

Plonk Reading Series

PLONK Reading Series

Wednesday October 5, 2016
7:00p.m.

Cork Screw Wine Bar
1665 SE Bybee Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202

 

Alex Behr, of Portland, OR, has taught creative writing to teens through Literary Arts’ Writers in the Schools program. Her work has appeared in Nailed Magazine, Salon, Bitch, Tin House, Propeller, Lumina, Watershed Review, and elsewhere. Two of her stories were performed in July 2016 as part of the 5th Annual Northern Writes series in Los Angeles.

Cathy Cain‘s honors include the Kay Snow Paulann Petersen Poetry Award from Willamette Writers; the Edwin Markham Prize for Poetry from Reed Magazine; and awards from the Oregon Poetry Association. Her work has appeared in VoiceCatcher, The Poeming Pigeon, and is forthcoming in Verseweavers. Cathy has previously served as poetry co-editor at VoiceCatcher. She is a two-year Poet’s Studio alumna and a 2014-2015 Atheneum Fellow, both at the Attic Institute. Additionally, she has studied with Portland’s Mountain Writers.

Deborah Dombrowski is a writer and photographer who discovered Portland at the age of 22 and stayed. Deborah loves every form of water (except the endless winter rain) and can often be found next to a river, or at the foot of Neakhanie mountain. Her website brings words and images together to consider the passage of time, the surprising strength of our affections, and every kind of blossoming. (www.lightswim.blogspot.com)

Leanne Grabel, M.Ed., is a poet, memoirist, illustrator and semi-retired special ed and language arts teacher. Her books include Brontosaurus: A Memoir; Lonesome & Very Quarrelsome Heroes; Short Poems by a Short Poet; Badgirls, and most recently Assisted Living, a chapbook of graphic rectangular prose poems. Grabel is currently finishing an anthology of 30 years of graphic flash writing called The Circus of Anguish & Mirth.

As seen adjusting her undergarments in public, writer,humorist, nut-job, Carisa Miller, lives in SW Portland with her exceptionally patient husband, two fireball daughters, an ill-tempered cat, a dog she’s allergic to, and horrendous PMS. Her published essays, one-liners, blog, and social media gobbledygook can be found at CarisaMiller.com.

Elizabeth Scott is a writer and clinical psychologist who has lived in Portland for nearly 30 years. She studied with Tom Spanbauer for many years as well as with other accomplished local and national writers. She has had numerous stories published in literary journals and recently received honorable mention in a Glimmer Train contest. She served two terms on the board of Oregon Literary Arts.

Suzanne Sigafoos is author of Held in the Weave, a collection of poems published by Finishing Line Press. Her poems have appeared in The Oregonian, in Windfall: a Journal of Poetry of Place, and the anthology The Knotted Bond: Oregon Poets Speak of Their Sisters. Her lyric essay, “Green,” published in Bellingham Review’s Issue 71, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Sigafoos is co-founder of River Rock, a poetry critique group in Portland, Oregon, her home since 1999.

VoiceCatcher thanks PLONK Reading Series and Cork Screw Wine Bar for hosting this event.

Peregrine Literary Series f. VoiceCatcher, Sunday May 15

All are invited to hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. 

May Peregrine flyer

Peregrine Literary Series

Sunday, May 15, 2016
3:00p.m.
Holynames Heritage Center
17425 Holy Names Drive
Lake Oswego, OR 97034

 

 

erin iwata photoErin Iwata calls Ridgefield, Washington her little home on the prairie, where she is a doula, writer, mother to men, and teacher on hiatus. She loves how writing connects us and thrives on the bright edges of human experience. ​ Erin is active in the literary community of the Pacific NorthWest. Her work recently appeared on 33 public buses, local literary magazines, newspapers, and featured at Show and Tell Gallery Assembly.  You can find where Erin will next appear by following her website www.eriniwata.com

 

joan maiers photo

 

Joan Maiers, works with writers of all ages, and serves on the boards for Friends of William Stafford, and the Clackamas Cultural Coalition. She hosts the Peregrine Literary Series. Her work appears in numerous journals, anthologies and collections. She is preparing her poetry manuscript, Specific Gravity, for publication.

 

 

stacy vallas photo

 

Stacey Vallas holds a Ph.D. in English and has taught at Reed College and Portland State University. She has published essays in Arizona Quarterly and The Oregonian and is currently a member of the Poets Studio at the Attic Institute. She lives and works as a teacher and tutor in Portland.

 

 

VoiceCatcher thanks Peregrine Literary Series and Holynames Heritage Center for hosting this event.

VoiceCatcher Reading at Stonehenge Studios, Nov. 8, 2015

All are invited to hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. 

stonehenge_studio

Sunday, November 8, 2015
7:00–9:00 p.m.
Stonehenge Studios
3508 SW Corbett Avenue
Portland, OR 97239

 

Cathy Cain is a writer, painter and printmaker whose work appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. She was a 2014-15 Atheneum Fellow in Poetry at the Attic Institute, as well as a Poet’s Studio member there from 2012-14. She has also benefited from numerous Mountain Writers’ workshops. Her work has appeared in VoiceCatcher and Poeming Pigeons. Cathy is finalizing her book-length poetry collection tentatively titled Alive All At Once and is a poetry co-editor for the Winter 2016 issue of VoiceCatcher. She has enjoyed being part of Portland’s writing community.

Juleen Johnson was published in the Summer 2015 issue of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. She is also a poetry co-editor for the Winter 2016 issue of VoiceCatcher. She is co-founder of Soundings: An Evening of Word and Sound. Juleen has been invited to read at BuzzPoems, Ink Noise Review, Open Door Enjambment and Cirque in Portland, Oregon. In California, she has read at the Steinbeck Museum, Hartnell College, Steinbeck Library and CSU Monterey Bay. Juleen attended the Wassaic Residency in Wassaic, New York. Her poems have appeared in print publications, including Cirque: A Literary JournalInk Noise ReviewSymmetryNervous BreakdownThe Rio Grand Review and Buried Letter Press. Juleen currently writes and creates art in Portland.

Darla Mottram’s work appeared in the Summer 2015 issue of VoiceCatcher. She is a soon-to-be graduate of Marylhurst University. Her work has recently been featured in NAILED Magazine, among others, and is forthcoming at The Birds We Piled Loosely. She is a co-founder of the social practice project Put-Pockets (put-pockets.tumblr.com), a blog that documents creative ways of putting poetry into the world.

Jennifer Kemnitz lives and writes in Portland. She is a great defender of plant life and can be roused at any moment to an impassioned discussion of its innate intelligence. Her work has appeared in the KerfVoiceCatcher and We’Moon, and has been anthologized by Poetry on the Lake and The Poetry Box. She is a reader for We’Moon, and is proud to serve as a poetry co-editor for the Winter 2016 issue of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. Jennifer’s work appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of VoiceCatcher.

Tricia Knoll is a Portland poet. Her work appears in numerous journals. A chapbook Urban Wild is out from Finishing Line Press. Ocean’s Laughter, poetry about Manzanita, Oregon, will be published by Aldrich Press in December 2015. Her work is forthcoming in the Winter 2016 issue of VoiceCatcher.

 

 

VoiceCatcher thanks Stonehenge Studios for hosting this event.

About Our Readers: July 31, 2015 VoiceCatcher Event

Hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions, Friday, July 31, 2015, Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97202, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Meet and mingle with others in the VoiceCatcher community. The reading is open to all.

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich is a poet and project manager who enjoys living, working and writing in Portland, Oregon.

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas is a writer, editor and spoken word artist. Her fiction, nonfiction and poetry have appeared in The Utne Reader, The Nervous Breakdown, Southwestern American Literature, Fourth River, Weber – The Contemporary West, and Bayou Magazine, among other publications. In 2014 her work was a finalist for the Best of the Net award. She is the author of the fiction chapbook Pyrophitic (ELJ Publications, 2014) and holds an MFA from Pacific University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she serves as a collaborative editor with Indigo Editing & Publications and a reader for Tin House Magazine.

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory lives in Washougal, Washington. Her poetry has appeared in Bamboo Ridge: The Hawaii Writers’ Quarterly; La’ila’I; Sister Stew: Fiction and Poetry by Women; VoiceCatcher, the Winter Issue, 2013; Just Now, 20 New Portland Poets; and America the National Catholic Weekly, Dec 2. 2013 and March 2, 2015.

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston is an Oregon writer and filmmaker. Her poems have appeared in such journals as Calyx, Gold Man Review, Natural Bridge, and War, Literature and the Arts. She is a recipient of a fellowship from Oregon Literary Arts and was selected as a Fishtrap Fellow. Her collection of poems about a family’s healing from war, Red Dust Rising, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger is a junior at the Oregon Episcopal School in Portland. She loves travel, soccer, photography and science. She tends to write in short bursts which make no sense but are strangely effective.

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose has published stories, essays, poems, reviews and a novel called Little Miss Strange (Algonquin), as well as other pieces that do not fall into any of those categories. Her work appeared most recently in Cream City Review, CloudBank and Oregon Humanities, and in the anthology The Night, and the Rain, and the River (Forest Avenue Press). With her teaching partner Stevan Allred, she is co-host of the Pinewood Table critique group. She has dogs, and would usually rather be at the beach. She sometimes hangs out at www.joannarose.xyz.

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge’s poems have appeared in Gravel, Apeiron Review, Right Hand Pointing, Cryopoetry, and other print and online journals. Her poems have been shortlisted for numerous awards, and nominated for inclusion in both the Pushcart and Best of the Net anthologies. Her fifth and sixth chapbooks, Move Your Lips When You Read and Road to Damascus were released by Grizelda Press, December 2014.

 

July 31 flyerClick here for the flyer for this event, for your own sharing and posting.

VoiceCatcher thanks Ford Food and Drink for hosting this event.

About Our Readers: July 31, 2015 VoiceCatcher Event

Hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions, Friday, July 31, 2015, Ford Food and Drink, 2505 SE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97202, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Meet and mingle with others in the VoiceCatcher community. The reading is open to all.

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich

Sarah Bokich is a poet and project manager who enjoys living, working and writing in Portland, Oregon.

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas

Susan DeFreitas is a writer, editor and spoken word artist. Her fiction, nonfiction and poetry have appeared in The Utne Reader, The Nervous Breakdown, Southwestern American Literature, Fourth River, Weber – The Contemporary West, and Bayou Magazine, among other publications. In 2014 her work was a finalist for the Best of the Net award. She is the author of the fiction chapbook Pyrophitic (ELJ Publications, 2014) and holds an MFA from Pacific University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she serves as a collaborative editor with Indigo Editing & Publications and a reader for Tin House Magazine.

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory

Stella Jeng Guillory lives in Washougal, Washington. Her poetry has appeared in Bamboo Ridge: The Hawaii Writers’ Quarterly; La’ila’I; Sister Stew: Fiction and Poetry by Women; VoiceCatcher, the Winter Issue, 2013; Just Now, 20 New Portland Poets; and America the National Catholic Weekly, Dec 2. 2013 and March 2, 2015.

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston

Marilyn Johnston is an Oregon writer and filmmaker. Her poems have appeared in such journals as Calyx, Gold Man Review, Natural Bridge, and War, Literature and the Arts. She is a recipient of a fellowship from Oregon Literary Arts and was selected as a Fishtrap Fellow. Her collection of poems about a family’s healing from war, Red Dust Rising, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger

Kate Pippenger is a junior at the Oregon Episcopal School in Portland. She loves travel, soccer, photography and science. She tends to write in short bursts which make no sense but are strangely effective.

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose

Joanna Rose has published stories, essays, poems, reviews and a novel called Little Miss Strange (Algonquin), as well as other pieces that do not fall into any of those categories. Her work appeared most recently in Cream City Review, CloudBank and Oregon Humanities, and in the anthology The Night, and the Rain, and the River (Forest Avenue Press). With her teaching partner Stevan Allred, she is co-host of the Pinewood Table critique group. She has dogs, and would usually rather be at the beach. She sometimes hangs out at www.joannarose.xyz.

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge

Cindy St. Onge’s poems have appeared in Gravel, Apeiron Review, Right Hand Pointing, Cryopoetry, and other print and online journals. Her poems have been shortlisted for numerous awards, and nominated for inclusion in both the Pushcart and Best of the Net anthologies. Her fifth and sixth chapbooks, Move Your Lips When You Read and Road to Damascus were released by Grizelda Press, December 2014.

 

July 31 flyerClick here for the flyer for this event, for your own sharing and posting.

VoiceCatcher thanks Ford Food and Drink for hosting this event.

About Our Readers: June 16, 2015 VoiceCatcher Event

All are invited to hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, Milepost 5, 850 NE 81st Avenue, Portland, OR 97213. Social hour 7:00 p.m., reading at 7:30 p.m.

Stephanie GlazierStephanie Glazier’s poems appear or are forthcoming in the Iraq Literary Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, The Fourth River and others. She has been a Lambda fellow in poetry and holds an MFA from Antioch University LA. She lives and works in Portland, Oregon.

Cindy HinesCindy Hines lives in Portland, Oregon. She graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in English from Lewis & Clark College, where she was co-winner in the Academy of American Poets Prize competition. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous publications including: Adrienne, Clackamas Literary Review, Windfall, Four and Twenty, The Lewis & Clark Literary Review, Synergia, Synesthesia, and The Haraka Reader.

Pattie Palmer BakerPattie Palmer-Baker returns to VoiceCatcher as a Summer 2015 issue poetry editor. An artist as well as a poet, she enhances her own artwork with her poetry in calligraphic form. Because so many people have responded even more strongly to the words than the images, she participated in workshops taught by several local well-known poets. To her surprise, she discovered her motivation to write poems surpassed her desire to create visual artwork. She started submitting her poems to journals and her work has appeared in Analeka and Elohi Gadugi, besides VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. Her poem “50,000 Bumblebees Die” was part of the “Unnatural Acts” exhibit at the Milepost Gallery 5 in Portland. She earned a 2014 Pushcart nomination from VoiceCatcher.

Judith PulmanJudith Pulman writes poetry and prose in Portland, where she also translates poems from Russian to English, just to keep things light. She has been published in or has work forthcoming in The Writer’s Chronicle, Los Angeles Review, Brevity, New Ohio Review and VoiceCatcher. She works as a teacher, administrator and editor.

Tammy RobackerTammy Robacker served as poet laureate of Tacoma, Washington in 2010-11, and she is a 2011 Hedgebrook writer-in-residence award winner. In 2009, she published her first collection of poetry, The Vicissitudes. Her manuscript We Ate Our Mothers, Girls placed as a finalist in the Floating Bridge Chapbook Contest. Tammy’s poetry has appeared in Canopic Jar, Duende, So to Speak, Crab Creek Review, WomenArts, Comstock Review, Up the Staircase Quarterly, and Cascadia Review. Currently enrolled in the MFA program for Creative Writing at Pacific Lutheran University, Tammy is working on a second poetry book collection and volunteering at CALYX –  a feminist press – while living in Oregon.

Christi R SuzanneFirst-time VoiceCatcher prose editor Christi R. Suzanne left the dry heat of the Arizona desert for mistier climes, and arrived in the Pacific Northwest over twelve years ago. She is a writer and sleeping dog enthusiast. By day she works as a web and communications professional at a university where she is the editor of the quarterly newsletter, Connections. She writes novels, short stories and personal essays and has been published in the anthologies Crack the Spine and Miles to Go, as well as The Lit Pub blog, The National Center for Death with Dignity blog, and the online journals Wonder and Risk and The Splinter Generation.

june16flyerClick here for the flyer for this event, for your own sharing and posting.

VoiceCatcher thanks Milepost 5 for hosting this event.

About Our Readers and Artists: May 14, 2015 VoiceCatcher Event

All are invited to hear these contributors to VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. 

Thursday, May 14, 2015
7:00–9:00 p.m.
The Waypost
3120 N. Williams Ave.
Portland, OR 97227

Sarah BorstenSarah Borsten is enrolled in the 2014-15 Poetry Certificate Program at the Independent Publishing Resource Center in Portland. Her poetry has appeared in The Roanoke Review, Cross Currents, and The Pregnant Moon Review. Her work will appear in VoiceCatcher’s Summer 2015 issue.

Heather DurhamHeather Durham is a restoration ecologist and naturalist currently pursuing an MFA in creative nonfiction through the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts. A city dweller with the soul of a hermit, she can often be found in the wild places in and around Portland with a journal, a field guide and a pair of binoculars –  head cocked, listening to the birds.

Nancy FlynnNancy Flynn grew up on the Susquehanna River in northeastern Pennsylvania. She spent many years on a downtown creek in Ithaca, New York, and now lives in NE Portland near the mighty Columbia. She attended Oberlin College, Cornell University, and has a master’s in English from SUNY/Binghamton. Her writing has received an Oregon Literary Fellowship and the James Jones First Novel Fellowship. Poetry chapbooks include The Hours of Us (2007) and Eternity a Coal’s Throw (2012); her book-length collection, Every Door Recklessly Ajar, will be published by Cayuga Lake Books in spring 2015. Her work will appear in VoiceCatcher’s Summer 2015 issue. A complete list of her publications is on her website.

Allegra HeidelindeAllegra Heidelinde, the eldest, but shortest(!) of three sisters, grew up in Taos, New Mexico. A precocious reader, she gobbled up fairy tales to stay one step ahead of the big bad wolf. Her early love of story taught her the power of words and imagination. Love and creativity are her guiding beacons.

Emily RansdellEmily Ransdell holds an MFA in poetry and is a past recipient of an Academy of American Poets award. Her poems have been published in CutBank, Poetry Northwest, and The North Coast Squid. A resident of Camas, Washington, Emily recently left a 30-year career in corporate marketing to write full time. Her work will appear in VoiceCatcher’s Summer 2015 issue. She sends thanks to Brenda Shaughnessy for the loan of the poem title, My Water Children.

Jackie Shannon-HollisJackie Shannon-Hollis’ work has appeared in journals including The Sun, High Desert Journal, Inkwell and Slice Magazine. She is a native Oregonian, born and raised surrounded by wheat on the dry, east side of the state – now thriving in the cedars and wet on the west side. Her  essay in the VoiceCatcher Winter 2015 issue is part of a memoir in progress.

When you visit the Waypost, check out the artwork by VoiceCatcher Winter 2015 issue’s contributors Michelle Iris Latham and Kelly Neidig, on display through the end of May 2015:

Sibling2 by Michelle Latham

Sibling 2 by Michelle Iris Latham

Michelle Iris Latham is a visual artist residing in Portland, Oregon. By day she makes signs; by night she can be found experimenting in a variety of media, including printmaking, ink and watercolor. The “Siblings” is an ongoing set of illustrations based on found photographs. Michelle collects and references them as a way of exploring two concepts. The first is the desire to group things together and infer their similarities – in this case, this step is short-handed through the titling – in order to see them as a unit. And then, looking at them together, the next step is to begin to see their differences. She hopes that the images will convey different personalities and stories to each viewer.

Stratum by Kelly Neidig

Stratum by Kelly Neidig

Kelly Neidig lives and works in Portland, Oregon, creating vibrant abstract landscapes. Her process is meditative and peaceful, slowly building up layers of paint. Her paintings refer to the overall feeling of place without focusing on details. The playful colors become an element that creates a feeling of nostalgia. This allows viewers to call on their memories of place and connect with the painting based on their experiences. Kelly’s work has been included in collections of the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, WA; the Westin Hotel in Cincinnati, OH; and the U.S. Embassy in Doha, Qatar. Her work has also been featured in Traditional Home Magazine and on the TV shows Portlandia and Graceland.

Click here for the flyer for this event, for your own sharing and posting.

VoiceCatcher thanks the Waypost for hosting this event.

Catch These Voices and Visions!

March 8 2015Several VoiceCatcher authors are among those who will read on International Women’s Day:

Of Course I’m a Feminist!
Hosted by Ellen Goldberg
Sunday, March 8, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
TaborSpace
5441 SE Belmont St.
Portland, OR 97215

Featuring: Frances Payne Adler, Judith Arcana, Shawn Aveningo, Gail Barker, Judith Barrington, Emily Carr, Brittney Corrigan, Pam Crow, Linda Ferguson, Andrea Hollander, Tricia Knoll, Elise Kuechle, Carter McKenzie, Penelope Schott, Marilyn Stablein, Ila Suzanne, Carlyn Syvanen, and Sharon Wood-Wortman.

 

"The Way a Woman Knows" by Carolyn MartinBook launch for The Way a Woman Knows, by VoiceCatcher’s Carolyn Martin! Everyone is invited to join in the celebration.

Sunday, March 22, 2:00-4:00 p.m.
TaborSpace
5441 SE Belmont St.
Portland, OR 97215

Reading will take place in the dining room on lower level. Light refreshments.

 

 

Sarah FaganVoiceCatcher art editor and contributor Sarah Fagan is teaming up with other artists and businesses in Portland this summer. They will offer budding artists half-day, themed camps in Portland. For more information see: Treasure Island: A Pirate and Explorers Camp, ages 5-7, July 20-24, and Pioneer Camp for Girls, ages 8-11, Aug. 10-14, 2015.

 

Click here for the updated calendar of readings from VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices and visions.

Let us know of other offerings VoiceCatcher members are making in the community!

Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children

A New Year’s Gift to You: Writing and Visual Artist Residencies for Parents (II)
by Claudia F. Savage

The list for residencies available to parents seems to grow every day. But while some places seem to think a cramped one-bedroom apartment next to other artists who are up till 2 a.m. is perfect for a mother-artist and her infant, other places, like the assortment below, have really thought through the needs of a parent attending a residency. The Writer’s Colony at Dairy Hollow, The Atlantic Center for the Arts, and The Millay Colony are perfect for the mother-artist who is able to travel alone (maybe for the first time since the kids!) and craves quiet time to write, paint or sculpt in the presence of other adults. Island Hill House and Women’s Studio Workshop let you bring your kids along.

Island Hill House Artist Residency Program
The Hill House is a two-story log cabin in northern Michigan that can accommodate up to four people at one time. “If you are selected,” according to Yvonne Stephens, director, “you have the whole house to yourself.” It is a rural area that gets heavy snow, so artists should be prepared for isolation.

Where: East Jordan, Michigan
How Long: 2-4 weeks
What You Get: An artist may bring up to three children and/or caregivers while in residence. The house accommodates up to four people (two bedrooms and two bathrooms). Basic child safety equipment, a pack-and-play, and a highchair are included, and two artist parents may be in residence together if they are both accepted into the program. The residency also fully stocks the kitchen with whatever you desire, including fresh local foods in summer and fall specifically. Though no stipend is offered, childcare is available and covered.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers, visual artists, dancers and musicians
Apply: Application deadline is April 1 (for June-November residency) and October 1 (for December-May residency), application fee is $25, submit.

The Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow (My Time Fellowship)
Dairy Hollow’s mission is “to provide time, lodging, feeding, and artistic community to writers in the historic arts village of Eureka Springs, Arkansas.”

Where: Eureka Springs, Arkansas
How Long: Two weeks
What You Get: Stipend of $1,500 to help pay for child care, travel expenses, or time lost at work. Private suite with writing space and bathroom. Dinner five nights a week in community dining room; community kitchen stocked for breakfast and lunch.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers (composers, culinary writers, fiction writers and poets)
Apply: Application deadline is July 31, application fee is $35, submit.

Women’s Studio Workshop
Women’s Studio Workshop (WSW) offers a Parent Residency Grant for woman artists with dependent children under the age of 15.

Where: Rosendale, New York
How Long: Four weeks (January-June or September-December)
What You Get: $250 travel stipend and $1,000 stipend for child care at WSW or child care at home. A dedicated studio and two-bedroom apartment with bathroom, kitchen and living area for the parent-artist and her children. Facilities for etching, hand papermaking, letterpress, silkscreen, book arts, photography and ceramics.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: visual artists
Apply: Application deadline is October 15, no application fee, submit.

Atlantic Center for the Arts (ACA)
A three-week residency where Associate Artists (writing, visual art, music or dance) work with a Master Artist and collaborate with each other. Nick Conroy, residency and program director, says, “Once accepted to the ACA, literary or visual parent-artists provide a copy of their child’s birth certificate with their financial aid application and the $800 residency tuition is covered.”

Where: New Smyrna, Florida
How Long: Three weeks
What You Get: Free residency tuition (valued at $800 and covering full room and board) for one parent-artist, visual artist studio, dining hall, recording facility, library and performance space.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers or visual artists
Apply: Application deadlines vary based on residency session, application fee is $25, submit.

The Millay Colony
According to Caroline Crumpacker, executive director of The Millay Colony, “Millay’s Virtual Residency accommodates artists who cannot spend prolonged time away from home but could benefit from the support of a residency in modified form.” Residents can stay for as long as they want over the course of a month. Crumpacker says, “We make it possible for parents to come here solo, by making our residencies as flexible and accessible to parents as we can. This residency is specifically for parents who can’t take long chunks away from home but need extra help with childcare and a special getaway.” The resident artist can, for example, participate on weekends only (with a minimum of five nights and days at the residency and the intent to continue specific work at home during the rest of the residency month).

Where: Austerlitz, New York
How Long: Several options (twelve days, two weeks, one month, or their “virtual” residency for a month).
What You Get: Free room and board for your stay, with a $1,000 stipend for “virtual” residents to assist in securing time off/childcare/travel to and from the colony/art supplies or other resources necessary to the making of new work.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers, visual artists, dancers, or composers/musicians
Apply: Application deadlines vary based on residency session (October 1 for April, May, June, and July or March 1 for August, September, October, and November), application fee is $35, submit.

 

Claudia F. SavageClaudia F. Savage has been a chef for people recovering from illness, a book editor, and a teacher of poetry to young women in Appalachia, ranchers in Colorado, and urbanites in Portland. Her first book, The Limited Visibility of Bees, was named a finalist for the New Issues Press Poetry Prize. Her poetry and interview credits include CutBank, Nimrod, The Denver Quarterly, VoiceCatcher, Iron Horse, The Buddhist Poetry Review, and Bookslut. Her published chapbook is called The Last One Eaten: A Maligned Vegetable’s History. Savage is a member of the poetry/music duo, THrum, whose album is forthcoming in spring 2015. This article continues her series for VoiceCatcher, Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children.

Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children

A Holiday Gift to You: Writing and Visual Artist Residencies for Parents (Part I)
by Claudia F. Savage

This summer, my husband, John, and I had an artist friend for dinner who does not have children. “So, when are you two going to be doing your next residency?” (He knew I had met John at The Atlantic Center for the Arts.) Then our friend pointed towards our sleeping daughter’s room and laughed. “Oh, sorry, I forgot.”

Things are changing. Below are five places that want to support your efforts to keep creating (while bringing your children with you or taking needed time away from them). In Part II of this series, I will offer five more. The wonderful Sustainable Arts Foundation (SAF) is supporting the vision of these residencies:

Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program
Since its inception in 1967, Roswell has accommodated families. Stephen Fleming, director of the Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program, says, “A few children have [even] been born on the residency … or, at least, here in town. Every artist has their own separate living space so they are free to hang out together or remain uninvolved according to their own requirements.”

Where: Roswell, New Mexico
How Long: 12 months!
What You Get: $800 a month stipend for the artist and $200 for each dependent with no restriction on how the funds are used. A house/studio with three small bedrooms, living room, kitchen, bathroom, and laundry. “A family of four is the typical number of folks per house,” says Fleming.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: visual artists (painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography, installation and other fine art media)
Apply: Application deadline is March 15, application fee is $25, submit

Headlands
Headlands has been supporting professional artist-parents since the 1980s. According to Holly Blake, residency manager, “The Family House is offered as a resource to help make a residency more possible for an artist. Two of our staff members have younger children and can offer advice about babysitting and local pre-schools.”

Where: Sausalito, CA
How Long: Two weeks (Spring, March-May; Summer, June-August; and Fall, September-November), with, according to Blake, “many artists doing a week solo and then a week with their family.”
What You Get: Family House (three bedrooms, bathroom, shared kitchen, and washer/dryer), five chef-prepared meals per week served in the mess hall (which the artist’s family can join at no charge), a studio, $500 per month stipend, roundtrip airfare, and use of shared cars.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers and visual artists
Apply: Application deadline is June 6, application fee $45 (make sure to request a Family House stay in your application’s statement of interest), submit

Caldera
Elizabeth Quinn, artist-in-residence director, says that Caldera began family residencies last year thanks to an SAF grant and as an extension of its mission to work and support youth. “We think each family will be different in how much the child of the artist-parent is involved in the activities of the residency. Caldera’s goal is to manage expectations and ensure a positive experience for everyone [attending the residency].”

Where: Sisters, Oregon
How Long: One month (January, February or March) or two weeks (March)
What You Get: A variable stipend that can be used as needed to support the family. (“Last year $1,500 was awarded to two artists,” Quinn said. “One family used it for childcare; another family used it to support the living expenses of the family while in residence.”) Private cabin that is child-proofed, has children-sized furniture, bathroom, and kitchen. Shared access to studios, darkroom, kiln, editing facilities, and performance space.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writing, visual artists, and composers
Apply: Application deadline is June 15, application fee is $35, submit

Kala Art Institute
Last year, Kala Art Institute awarded ten residencies to artists with children. “We don’t have housing at Kala. Artists are given a housing resource list with lower-than-market rates [for accommodations],” says Carrie Hott, program manager, Artist Residencies and Classes.

Where: Berkeley, CA
How Long: Varies based on residency plan designed by artist and Kala staff with “most parent-artists using the award for at least two months or putting a portion of their fees towards classes or tutoring to gain a new skill,” according to Hott.
What You Get: $1,000 stipend allows resident to create a plan to cover the residency, classes, Camp Kala for their children, or professional development with Kala staff.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: visual artists (printmaking, photography, or digital media)
Apply: Application deadline is March 15, application fee is $10-40 (depending on if you apply for an additional fellowship), submit

Santa Fe Art Institute (SFAI Family Residency Initiative)
Nina Elder, the residency program manager at SFAI, says, “We recognize the lack of residency opportunities for artists to be able to take advantage of, without having to leave their children behind. We are doing our part to close that gap by offering an environment that supports both creative opportunities and the needs of artists with children. Our next family month will be June 2016.”

Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico
How Long: One designated month a year
What You Get: Two apartments at the SFAI for a fee of $1,000. “The Family Initiative allows parent artists to bring their children and/or partner at no additional fee. All residents make their own meals in the communal kitchen,” says Elder. The SFAI facility includes gallery and exhibition spaces, sky-lit studios, art library, courtyards, laundry facilities, and dining and living room areas.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers and visual artists
Apply: Application deadline is January 31 for residencies August–June, application fee is $35 (check the Family Initiative box on the application), submit

Claudia F. SavageClaudia F. Savage has been a chef for people recovering from illness, a book editor, and a teacher of poetry to young women in Appalachia, ranchers in Colorado, and urbanites in Portland. Her first book, The Limited Visibility of Bees, was named a finalist for the New Issues Press Poetry Prize. Her poetry and interview credits include CutBank, Nimrod, The Denver Quarterly, VoiceCatcher, Iron Horse, The Buddhist Poetry Review, and Bookslut. Her published chapbook is called The Last One Eaten: A Maligned Vegetable’s History. Savage is a member of the poetry/music duo, THrum, whose album is forthcoming in spring 2015. This article continues her series for VoiceCatcher, Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children.