Rock Your Readings! A Workshop

Workshop: Rock Your Readings  1:30–3:00 p.m.
Stumptown Lit Festival, Portland, Oregon, Sunday, October 25, 2015

Alexis Mason

Alexis Mason

If you get queasy and clammy handed before stepping up to a lectern to share your work, you will benefit from this workshop. You may also learn the difference between a podium and a lectern!

The fast-paced workshop – co-sponsored by VoiceCatcher, the Oregon Writers Colony and the Thrill of the Quill Toastmasters club – kicks off with Cindy Brown, author of the Ivy Meadows mystery series, sharing tips she learned planning and executing her two tremendously popular book launch parties.

Alexis Mason, of the Thrill of the Quill Toastmasters club, will add to the workshop with information geared to assist writers, of any genre, prepare and deliver better presentations with the help of specific exercises and insights.

Cindy Brown is a full-time writer, the author of Macdeath (An Ivy Meadows Mystery) (Volume 1) and The Sound of Murder ( An Ivy Meadows Mystery) (Volume 2). She has garnered several awards (including 3rd place in the 2013 international Words With Jam First Page Competition, judged by Sue Grafton), and is an alumna of the Squaw Valley Writers Workshop. Although Cindy and her husband now live in Portland, Oregon, she made her home in Phoenix, Arizona, for more than 25 years and knows all the good places to hide dead bodies in both cities.

Alexis Mason is a speaker, author, coach and storyteller. She holds a master’s degree from PSU and has over 35 years teaching experience. She is the owner of Present Yourself, where she offers coaching in leadership and communication skill development. She presents workshops, seminars and keynote presentations on a variety of subjects. As a storyteller, Alexis does monthly presentations to senior communities in and around Vancouver, Washington. Alexis is the author of several business and children’s books.

For more info on the Stumptown Lit Festival, and workshop fee information and registration, please click here.

Be sure to stop by VoiceCatcher’s table at the festival!

Share Resources and Celebrate Successes – No. 3

Willa SchnebergVoiceCatcher contributor Willa Schneberg will be the final judge for the Calyx Journal 2015 Lois Cranston Memorial Poetry Prize. Submissions accepted Mar. 1-May 31. More information here.

 

 

copy-vchomebanner.jpgThe submission window is open now for the Summer 2015 issue of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions.

 

 

 

This column celebrates publication news from VoiceCatcher authors. We hope you find the information helpful as you research where to send your own work. Please share your own information with the VC community.  – The Editors

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Related posts:
Poetry in Bytes: submitting to online poetry publications
An Invitation to Share Resources, Celebrate Success
Share Resources and Celebrate Successes, No. 1
Share Resources and Celebrate Successes, No. 2

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Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children

A New Year’s Gift to You: Writing and Visual Artist Residencies for Parents (II)
by Claudia F. Savage

The list for residencies available to parents seems to grow every day. But while some places seem to think a cramped one-bedroom apartment next to other artists who are up till 2 a.m. is perfect for a mother-artist and her infant, other places, like the assortment below, have really thought through the needs of a parent attending a residency. The Writer’s Colony at Dairy Hollow, The Atlantic Center for the Arts, and The Millay Colony are perfect for the mother-artist who is able to travel alone (maybe for the first time since the kids!) and craves quiet time to write, paint or sculpt in the presence of other adults. Island Hill House and Women’s Studio Workshop let you bring your kids along.

Island Hill House Artist Residency Program
The Hill House is a two-story log cabin in northern Michigan that can accommodate up to four people at one time. “If you are selected,” according to Yvonne Stephens, director, “you have the whole house to yourself.” It is a rural area that gets heavy snow, so artists should be prepared for isolation.

Where: East Jordan, Michigan
How Long: 2-4 weeks
What You Get: An artist may bring up to three children and/or caregivers while in residence. The house accommodates up to four people (two bedrooms and two bathrooms). Basic child safety equipment, a pack-and-play, and a highchair are included, and two artist parents may be in residence together if they are both accepted into the program. The residency also fully stocks the kitchen with whatever you desire, including fresh local foods in summer and fall specifically. Though no stipend is offered, childcare is available and covered.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers, visual artists, dancers and musicians
Apply: Application deadline is April 1 (for June-November residency) and October 1 (for December-May residency), application fee is $25, submit.

The Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow (My Time Fellowship)
Dairy Hollow’s mission is “to provide time, lodging, feeding, and artistic community to writers in the historic arts village of Eureka Springs, Arkansas.”

Where: Eureka Springs, Arkansas
How Long: Two weeks
What You Get: Stipend of $1,500 to help pay for child care, travel expenses, or time lost at work. Private suite with writing space and bathroom. Dinner five nights a week in community dining room; community kitchen stocked for breakfast and lunch.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers (composers, culinary writers, fiction writers and poets)
Apply: Application deadline is July 31, application fee is $35, submit.

Women’s Studio Workshop
Women’s Studio Workshop (WSW) offers a Parent Residency Grant for woman artists with dependent children under the age of 15.

Where: Rosendale, New York
How Long: Four weeks (January-June or September-December)
What You Get: $250 travel stipend and $1,000 stipend for child care at WSW or child care at home. A dedicated studio and two-bedroom apartment with bathroom, kitchen and living area for the parent-artist and her children. Facilities for etching, hand papermaking, letterpress, silkscreen, book arts, photography and ceramics.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: visual artists
Apply: Application deadline is October 15, no application fee, submit.

Atlantic Center for the Arts (ACA)
A three-week residency where Associate Artists (writing, visual art, music or dance) work with a Master Artist and collaborate with each other. Nick Conroy, residency and program director, says, “Once accepted to the ACA, literary or visual parent-artists provide a copy of their child’s birth certificate with their financial aid application and the $800 residency tuition is covered.”

Where: New Smyrna, Florida
How Long: Three weeks
What You Get: Free residency tuition (valued at $800 and covering full room and board) for one parent-artist, visual artist studio, dining hall, recording facility, library and performance space.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers or visual artists
Apply: Application deadlines vary based on residency session, application fee is $25, submit.

The Millay Colony
According to Caroline Crumpacker, executive director of The Millay Colony, “Millay’s Virtual Residency accommodates artists who cannot spend prolonged time away from home but could benefit from the support of a residency in modified form.” Residents can stay for as long as they want over the course of a month. Crumpacker says, “We make it possible for parents to come here solo, by making our residencies as flexible and accessible to parents as we can. This residency is specifically for parents who can’t take long chunks away from home but need extra help with childcare and a special getaway.” The resident artist can, for example, participate on weekends only (with a minimum of five nights and days at the residency and the intent to continue specific work at home during the rest of the residency month).

Where: Austerlitz, New York
How Long: Several options (twelve days, two weeks, one month, or their “virtual” residency for a month).
What You Get: Free room and board for your stay, with a $1,000 stipend for “virtual” residents to assist in securing time off/childcare/travel to and from the colony/art supplies or other resources necessary to the making of new work.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers, visual artists, dancers, or composers/musicians
Apply: Application deadlines vary based on residency session (October 1 for April, May, June, and July or March 1 for August, September, October, and November), application fee is $35, submit.

 

Claudia F. SavageClaudia F. Savage has been a chef for people recovering from illness, a book editor, and a teacher of poetry to young women in Appalachia, ranchers in Colorado, and urbanites in Portland. Her first book, The Limited Visibility of Bees, was named a finalist for the New Issues Press Poetry Prize. Her poetry and interview credits include CutBank, Nimrod, The Denver Quarterly, VoiceCatcher, Iron Horse, The Buddhist Poetry Review, and Bookslut. Her published chapbook is called The Last One Eaten: A Maligned Vegetable’s History. Savage is a member of the poetry/music duo, THrum, whose album is forthcoming in spring 2015. This article continues her series for VoiceCatcher, Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children.

Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children

A Holiday Gift to You: Writing and Visual Artist Residencies for Parents (Part I)
by Claudia F. Savage

This summer, my husband, John, and I had an artist friend for dinner who does not have children. “So, when are you two going to be doing your next residency?” (He knew I had met John at The Atlantic Center for the Arts.) Then our friend pointed towards our sleeping daughter’s room and laughed. “Oh, sorry, I forgot.”

Things are changing. Below are five places that want to support your efforts to keep creating (while bringing your children with you or taking needed time away from them). In Part II of this series, I will offer five more. The wonderful Sustainable Arts Foundation (SAF) is supporting the vision of these residencies:

Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program
Since its inception in 1967, Roswell has accommodated families. Stephen Fleming, director of the Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program, says, “A few children have [even] been born on the residency … or, at least, here in town. Every artist has their own separate living space so they are free to hang out together or remain uninvolved according to their own requirements.”

Where: Roswell, New Mexico
How Long: 12 months!
What You Get: $800 a month stipend for the artist and $200 for each dependent with no restriction on how the funds are used. A house/studio with three small bedrooms, living room, kitchen, bathroom, and laundry. “A family of four is the typical number of folks per house,” says Fleming.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: visual artists (painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography, installation and other fine art media)
Apply: Application deadline is March 15, application fee is $25, submit

Headlands
Headlands has been supporting professional artist-parents since the 1980s. According to Holly Blake, residency manager, “The Family House is offered as a resource to help make a residency more possible for an artist. Two of our staff members have younger children and can offer advice about babysitting and local pre-schools.”

Where: Sausalito, CA
How Long: Two weeks (Spring, March-May; Summer, June-August; and Fall, September-November), with, according to Blake, “many artists doing a week solo and then a week with their family.”
What You Get: Family House (three bedrooms, bathroom, shared kitchen, and washer/dryer), five chef-prepared meals per week served in the mess hall (which the artist’s family can join at no charge), a studio, $500 per month stipend, roundtrip airfare, and use of shared cars.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers and visual artists
Apply: Application deadline is June 6, application fee $45 (make sure to request a Family House stay in your application’s statement of interest), submit

Caldera
Elizabeth Quinn, artist-in-residence director, says that Caldera began family residencies last year thanks to an SAF grant and as an extension of its mission to work and support youth. “We think each family will be different in how much the child of the artist-parent is involved in the activities of the residency. Caldera’s goal is to manage expectations and ensure a positive experience for everyone [attending the residency].”

Where: Sisters, Oregon
How Long: One month (January, February or March) or two weeks (March)
What You Get: A variable stipend that can be used as needed to support the family. (“Last year $1,500 was awarded to two artists,” Quinn said. “One family used it for childcare; another family used it to support the living expenses of the family while in residence.”) Private cabin that is child-proofed, has children-sized furniture, bathroom, and kitchen. Shared access to studios, darkroom, kiln, editing facilities, and performance space.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writing, visual artists, and composers
Apply: Application deadline is June 15, application fee is $35, submit

Kala Art Institute
Last year, Kala Art Institute awarded ten residencies to artists with children. “We don’t have housing at Kala. Artists are given a housing resource list with lower-than-market rates [for accommodations],” says Carrie Hott, program manager, Artist Residencies and Classes.

Where: Berkeley, CA
How Long: Varies based on residency plan designed by artist and Kala staff with “most parent-artists using the award for at least two months or putting a portion of their fees towards classes or tutoring to gain a new skill,” according to Hott.
What You Get: $1,000 stipend allows resident to create a plan to cover the residency, classes, Camp Kala for their children, or professional development with Kala staff.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: visual artists (printmaking, photography, or digital media)
Apply: Application deadline is March 15, application fee is $10-40 (depending on if you apply for an additional fellowship), submit

Santa Fe Art Institute (SFAI Family Residency Initiative)
Nina Elder, the residency program manager at SFAI, says, “We recognize the lack of residency opportunities for artists to be able to take advantage of, without having to leave their children behind. We are doing our part to close that gap by offering an environment that supports both creative opportunities and the needs of artists with children. Our next family month will be June 2016.”

Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico
How Long: One designated month a year
What You Get: Two apartments at the SFAI for a fee of $1,000. “The Family Initiative allows parent artists to bring their children and/or partner at no additional fee. All residents make their own meals in the communal kitchen,” says Elder. The SFAI facility includes gallery and exhibition spaces, sky-lit studios, art library, courtyards, laundry facilities, and dining and living room areas.
Artistic Disciplines Funded: writers and visual artists
Apply: Application deadline is January 31 for residencies August–June, application fee is $35 (check the Family Initiative box on the application), submit

Claudia F. SavageClaudia F. Savage has been a chef for people recovering from illness, a book editor, and a teacher of poetry to young women in Appalachia, ranchers in Colorado, and urbanites in Portland. Her first book, The Limited Visibility of Bees, was named a finalist for the New Issues Press Poetry Prize. Her poetry and interview credits include CutBank, Nimrod, The Denver Quarterly, VoiceCatcher, Iron Horse, The Buddhist Poetry Review, and Bookslut. Her published chapbook is called The Last One Eaten: A Maligned Vegetable’s History. Savage is a member of the poetry/music duo, THrum, whose album is forthcoming in spring 2015. This article continues her series for VoiceCatcher, Leave the Dishes: Making Art While Raising Children.

Share Resources and Celebrate Successes – No. 2

This column celebrates the publication successes of our VoiceCatcher authors. We hope you enjoy their work and find their comments on each publication helpful as you research where to send your own work. As soon as you are published, please let us know by using the format below, so we can include your success and any tips in a future posting. Email your information to editors(at)voicecatcher(dot)org and use the subject line: “I’m published.” (Note: Substitute the symbols “@” and “.” for (words) when you address your email, please.)   – The Editors

From Jean Harkin who earned her bachelor’s degree from Creighton University eons ago. Jean now lives in Washington County, Oregon. She is a member of Writers’ Mill group that meets monthly at the Cedar Mill Library, and writes fiction. Her novel Promise Full of Thorns is awaiting publication. 

From Raggedy Ann to the Halls of Creighton: One Writer’s Journey,” Creighton University Magazine, Fall 2014.

My essay was accepted by the Creighton University Magazine the day after I submitted it, but it was 14 months before being published online. In the meantime, the communications director was quite responsive to my many inquiries.

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From Carolyn Martin who is blissfully retired in Clackamas, OR, where she gardens, writes and plays with creative friends:

To the songbirds who spurned my feeder,” Songs of Eretz Review.

 The editor is a well-read, semi-retired M.D. He responded within two days with specific comments on the poems he declined. He offers authors two possibilities for publication: A spot in his daily Review (See link above) or an appearance in his e-zine. He estimates it will take him about three months to decide if a piece he gives a “first pass” to will make it into the latter. He is holding his first contest with a December 31, 2014 deadline. It’s fee-based, but offers a $500 first prize.

Just So You Know,” Star 82 Review

The editor responded quickly and publishes a simultaneous print-on-demand version of each online issue. The layout of this publication is quite unique.

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From Cristina L. White who writes fiction, nonfiction, memoir and plays:

Her most recent book, Sex and Soul: A Memoir of Salvation, has just been released by Letter Pen Press.

Doctor Snap,” a story about big-time therapy from a pint-sized gal, was published in Gay Flash Fiction.

This is online only, welcoming flash fiction and poetry which is GLBTQ friendly. Response time was quick (about three weeks), and the editor was direct, easy to work with, friendly.

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Penelope Scambly Schott’s new poetry collection, How I Became an Historian, was published in October 2014 by Cherry Grove Press.

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From Tricia Knoll, a VoiceCatcher journal and website contributor as well as one of our poetry mentors:

Her chapbook Urban Wild was just released by Finishing Line Press.

 “The Woman in the Pink Knitted Hat” appeared on the Voices Project in November 2015. Earlier it appeared in Portland’s street tabloid, Street Roots.

Five of Tricia Knoll’s poems appeared in July 2014 on Catch & Release — the literary blog of Columbia: A Journal of Art and Literature.

 I didn’t have any special relationships with the editors here. My advice is submit, submit, submit, and read past issues to see what a publication is printing.

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Related posts:
Poetry in Bytes: submitting to online poetry publications
An Invitation to Share Resources, Celebrate Success
Share Resources and Celebrate Successes, No. 1

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What’s On Your Bookshelf?

“What’s On Your Bookshelf” shares VoiceCatcher community members’ favorite books. Contact the editors to share your top recommendations for writers’ craft and reference books, as well as inspirational books for writers or artists. Include any comments to recommend the books to our readers. We could feature your bookshelf on this website!    –The Editors 

Featured Bookshelf: Theresa Snyder’s

The name of this post is misleading. The books listed below are never on my bookshelf. They sit at my elbow on my desk for quick reference. Hope you find the list helpful.  –Theresa Synder

Writer’s Guide to Character Traits, 2nd Ed., by Linda N. Edelstein, Ph.D
Noted psychologist and author Dr. Linda Edelstein takes you beyond generic personality types and into the depths of the human psyche where you’re sure to find the resources you need to make your characters stand out from the crowd. From sex to schizophrenia: everything you need to develop your characters.

The Emotion Thesaurus, A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression, by Angela Ackerman & Becca Puglisi
When showing characters’ feeling, we often grab onto the first idea that comes to mind, and our characters end up smiling, shrugging, nodding, and frowning far too much. This book gives your imagination an emotional boost! Establish the tone of your scene: anger, love, aggression, etc. Look it up in the book. There you will find 75 emotion entries that list body language, thoughts and visceral responses to each. There are also suggestions for each emotion that cover a range of intensity, from mild to extreme.

Rand McNally Quick Reference World Atlas
I like this edition because it is paperback and very thin. Believe it or not, I use it for character names. I write a lot of science fiction and fantasy, and the names of distant and foreign rivers, mountain ranges and lakes have all made their way into my twelve novels. Many times I will translate them and find that they are appropriate to the character, for instance when I found “Azur” meant fire and I needed a name for a fire demon.

The Writer’s Digest Character Naming Sourcebook, by Sherrilyn Kenyon
This book not only gives you more than 20,000 first and last names, and their meanings, from around the world, it also includes special advice for choosing historical, science fiction, fantasy, mystery, and action names with valuable instructions for naming your settings. Frankly, I cannot write about characters until they have a name – something that will always translate into writer’s block if not attended to promptly.

Wicked Words: A Treasury of Curses, Insults, Put-Downs, and Other Formerly Unprintable Terms from Anglo-Saxon Times to the Present, by Hugh Rawson
The title say it all and if you don’t want to say the word “f – – k” then this is the book for you. You can find a word from olden days that only a historical scholar would know and use it instead in your science fiction or fantasy. This book traces the origins, use and abuse of words we love to hate. It ranges widely, including personal insults, ethnic slurs, political attacks, plus a great collection of odd and interesting facts – fascinating excursion into social history and the idiosyncrasies of our language.

The Gregg Reference Manual, by William A. Sabin
I found this book during a past life in law. It is the cornerstone on the proper use of:
punctuation major and minor marks, capitalization, numbers, abbreviations, plurals and possessives, spelling, compound words, word division, grammar, usage, editing, proofreading and filing, letters and memos, reports and manuscripts, notes and bibliographies, tables, other business documents, forms of address, and glossaries of grammatical terms and computer terms.

These are the books I keep at hand on the corner of my desk or stacked by my chair. I hope you find them helpful. May the muse bless your brain and bring the words to your fingertips.

Theresa SnyderTheresa Snyder is a multi-genre writer with an internationally read blog. She grew up on a diet of black-and-white, sci-fi films like Forbidden Planet and The Day the Earth Stood Still. She is a voracious reader and her character-driven writing is influenced by the early works of Anne McCaffrey, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein and L. Ron Hubbard.

What’s On Your Bookshelf?

“What’s On Your Bookshelf” shares VoiceCatcher community members’ favorite books. Contact the editors to share your top recommendations for writers’ craft and reference books, as well as inspirational books for writers or artists. Include any comments to recommend the books to our readers. We could feature your bookshelf on this website!    –The Editors 

Featured Bookshelf: Barbara E. Berger’s
Recommended books on the craft of writing and developing as a writer or other artist:

The AP Stylebook Online 
The Associated Press’ stylebook seems to be on its way to becoming the standard outside of academia, despite any of our personal preferences. In fact, it is the basis for VoiceCatcher’s style. And sure, you can get a print copy of the AP guide, but it won’t automatically update itself during the year like this one.   Barbara

The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity, by Julia Cameron
This is a practical how-to guide on tapping into your creative self and developing it. Truly the seminal work on the subject; the one that popularized ‘morning pages.’ Barbara

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Lifeby Anne Lamott
Another essential for any writer who might, once in awhile, feel overwhelmed and not know where to start. That is, all of us?  Barbara

The Compulsion to Create: Women Writers and Their Demon Lovers, by Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD
Insight into the lives of six famous women writers by the founder of the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis – a lover of literature and well-published author in her own right.  Barbara

The Elements of Style, by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White
The classic that is as useful today as it was when first published in 1918. Clear, succinct, accessible; it models what it recommends.  Barbara

Writing Alone and With Others, by Pat Schneider
You will find many writers groups using Pat’s method for inspiring writing while giving nurturing feedback and support. Her workshops changed my writing life. Barbara

 

Barbara  E. BergerBarbara E. Berger is a Portland-based writer, editor and photographer. She specializes in government, business and other creative writing. Barbara serves as this site’s managing editor.

What’s On Your Bookshelf?

“What’s On Your Bookshelf” shares VoiceCatcher community members’ favorite books. Contact the editors to share your top recommendations for writers’ craft and reference books, as well as inspirational books for writers or artists. Include any comments to recommend the books to our readers. We could feature your bookshelf on this website!    –The Editors 

Featured Bookshelf: Marlene Kate Dalziel’s
Marlene highly recommends these books on grammar and writing:

The Elephants of Style: A Trunkload of Tips on the Big Issues and Gray Areas of Contemporary American English, by Bill Walsh

Grammar Girl’s Quick & Dirty Tips for Better Writing, by Mignon Fogarty
“Quirky and memorable,” says Marlene.

Lapsing Into a Comma: A Curmudgeon’s Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print – and How to Avoid Them, by Bill Walsh

Naked, Drunk and Writing, by Adair Lara
“Just simply wonderful,” says Marlene.

Woe is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide to Better English in Plain English, by Patricia O’Connor

Yes, I Could Care Less: How to be a Language Snob Without Being a Jerk, by Bill Walsh

 

Marlene Kate DalzielMarlene Kate Dalziel is a voracious reader and researcher with a life-long penchant for discovery and learning. Her education has followed an empirical path, allowing her the freedom to slue from one fascination to another. Writing, however, has always been the prime passion in her life. After decades in the full-time, button-down business world, she now works three days a week in a low-stress job, which allows her time to build her business as a freelance copy editor. Her blog, My Life’s P.A.C.E., has been on hiatus but will return in fall 2014.

Share Resources and Celebrate Successes – No. 1

This is the first installment celebrating the publication successes of our VoiceCatcher authors. We hope you enjoy their work and find their comments on each publication helpful as you research where to send your own work. As soon as you are published, please let us know by using the format below, so we can include your success and any tips in a future posting. Email your information to editors(at)voicecatcher(dot)org and use the subject line: “I’m published.” (Note: Substitute the symbols “@” and “.” for (words) when you address your email, please.)   – The Editors

From Shawn Aveningo, a globally published, award-winning poet who joins our community of authors with her poem “Binders Full of Women” in the Summer 2014 issue of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions. She shares the creative life and a business – The Poetry Box – with her best friend and soul-mate. They have recently made Portland, Oregon their home.

Shawn’s Publications and Tips
Thought Drops,” “American Cannibals,” “Poetically Opposed,” “Virtuoso” and “Crabgrass in Suburbia,” Whisperings Literary Journal (Volume 3 Issue 1) by Mountain Tales Press, March 2014.

Long response time (over 6 months), very professional and lovely publication.  Complimentary contributor copy. Acceptance also automatically submits author for Ghost Mountain Award as well as consideration for inclusion in Mot Juste Series™ Anthologies.

“Shape of Your Mouth” was top ten (honorable mention) in the annual Benicia Love Poem Contest for 2014 and will be included in a chapbook.

“Black Widows & Divorce,” Napalm & Novocain, February 7, 2014.

Very quick response time (8 days), online version only. Editors very easy to work with.

“Saturday Morning at Starbucks,” Something Brewing, a coffee-themed anthology by Kind of Hurricane Press, May 2014.

Very easy publisher to work with, nice perfect bound anthologies, several themed submission opportunities throughout the year.  Discounted contributor’s copy.

“Cancer Beetles,” “Blue Moon,” and “Shane’s Beach,” Boston Poetry Magazine (online only), Feb 16, 2014.

Quick response time (22 days), great for emerging/new writers.  High acceptance rate.

“Post Divorce Tarot Reading: A Courtship Trifecta,” PoeticDiversity-Spring Issue, April 2014 (online).

Editor is very picky about submission guidelines, so read them carefully. Great diversity in work as well as a mix of established and emerging writers.

“Pie Filling” and “Mapping His Freckles,” Kentucky Review, April 2014.

New online literary journal. Both emerging and established writers. Great to work with.

“Runaway,” River Poets Journal Special Edition Anthology, May 2014. (Theme: The Last Time I Ran Away.)

Very easy to work with, however contributors must pay full price for print copy. No complimentary or discounted contributor’s copies.

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From Tricia Knoll, a VoiceCatcher journal contributor as well as one of our poetry mentors. Her chapbook Urban Wild was just released by Finishing Line Press.

Tricia’s Publications and Tips
“Leftover After Holidays,” Your Daily Poem.

A daily email from Your Daily Poem brings a poem to you – often family-centered. The editor wants seasonal material 4-6 months before the season.

“The Pulmonologist’s Office,” Chest Journal.

This medical journal of chest-related medical concerns wants topical poems. About nine months from submission to online publication.

“Paper Money and Snake Eyes,” Glass: A Journal of Poetry.

Good response times.

“The Reunion of the Pussy Riot Singers,” New Verse News.

New Verse News is a great outlet for poetic reactions to today’s news. James Penha, the editor, is a delight to work with.

“Wahclella Falls,” Cascadia Review.

Be sure to read submission guidelines carefully to understand how the Review works.

“Demise of the Monarch,” New Verse News.

“With Me, Please,” Antiphon.

A British journal that seems to want lyric poetry.

“River Hair,” Muddy River Poetry Review.

A few years ago this journal was happy to publish one of my first online poems.

“The Shawl in My Closet,” Wolf Willow Journal.

A relatively new online journal out of Saskatchewan. Nice art and feeling to the site.

“Crabby Apples,” Trivia: The Voice of Feminism, June 2014.

Read the journal’s explanation for its title. Journal asks for a MP3 after acceptance to post with the poem so people hear the author reading, but this isn’t required.

“When We Crack, Let’s Do It Together,” Trivia: The Voices of Feminism.

“My Memory Stick,” Cattails, Spring 2014.

A journal of haiku, tanka, and haibun. Nice folks to work with.

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From Carolyn Martin,  president of VoiceCatcher and managing editor of VoiceCatcher: a journal of women’s voices & visions, Summer 2014.

Carolyn’s Publications and Tips
“Testimony,” Persimmon Tree, Winter 2014.

A publication focusing on women over sixty-years-old. Holds regional contests.

“The long trip here,” Mojave River Review, Winter 2014, p. 59.

A new journal out of southern California. Editor very easy to work with.

“In the made and raw,” Poetry Pacific.

A new Canadian publication that accepts reprints.

“Search for the ‘Lord God’ Bird,” Belle Reve Literary Journal, Spring 2014, p. 16.

This publication publishes Southern authors or Southern-focused work. They also take reprints.

“Storm Advisory,” Spark: A Creative Anthology, Vol. V

Check out this anthology’s series of contests. They are free to enter and the prizes are substantial. Winning does not automatically mean publication in their print anthologies. That requires a direct submission.

“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” “A sonnet to plotting amateurs,” “Your party invitation just arrived,” Antiphon, Summer 2014.

A British publication eager to reach across the pond for poetry. Another unique site. Thanks to Tricia Knoll for alerting me to this journal.

“Taking stock,” Star 82 Review, Summer 2014.

Literally, an overnight acceptance. Very eclectic site with a delightful editor. Each online issue is simultaneously printed in a slender, good-looking volume available on Amazon.

“Mary winds down the day,” Knotted Bond: Oregon Poets Speak of Their Sisters, edited by Liz Nakazawa. (Uttered Chaos Press, 2014). Available on Amazon.

An anthology of poems about the complicated relationships between sisters. Included are poems by VoiceCatcher authors Diane Averill, Margaret Chula, Cindy Williams Gutiérrez, Lisa Maier and Penelope Scambly Schott.

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Related posts:
Poetry in Bytes: submitting to online poetry publications
An Invitation to Share Resources, Celebrate Success

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